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DNA Sequencing Studies of Genomic cDNA Clones of Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus

  • M. E. G. Boursnell
  • T. D. K. Brown
Chapter
  • 343 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 173)

Abstract

Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) has a positive stranded RNA genome about 20 kilobases in length. The virus particle contains three major structural proteins, the nucleocapsid protein (which is associated with the RNA genome), the matrix or membrane protein and the spike or surface projection protein 1. Infection with IBV results in the synthesis of six major polyadenylated messenger RNAs 2. One of these is equal in size to the genomic RNA and the other five form a 3′ coterminal (‘nested’) set, with the sequences from each RNA present in all the larger RNA species 3. These mRNAs have been named A, B, C, D, E and F, RNA A being the smallest. In vitro translation studies 4, have shown that RNA A directs the synthesis of the viral nucleocapsid protein and RNA C directs the synthesis of the viral matrix polypeptide. Unpublished results of Stern and Sefton show that an unglycosylated form of the viral spike precursor can be synthesised by in vitro translation of RNA E.

Keywords

Infectious Bronchitis Virus Avian Infectious Bronchitis Virus Viral Nucleocapsid Protein Unglycosylated Form Chick Kidney Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. G. Boursnell
    • 1
  • T. D. K. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Houghton Poultry Research StationHoughton, HuntingdonEngland

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