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Problems Relating to Aging

Rationale for a Behavioral Approach
  • Larry W. Dupree
  • Michael J. O’Sullivan
  • Roger L. Patterson
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB, volume 89a)

Abstract

Old people are subject to the same problems as younger people. Therefore, when we speak of the problems of the elderly, we are usually referring to common human problems found in greater abundance among older people. A large number of problems of the elderly may be said to be related to major losses which tend to occur more frequently in later life. Those losses include loss of family and social contacts, reduction in work, economic loss, physiological and health impairment, decreased social and cultural status, and lowered self-evaluation. Usually the losses are gradual but also incremental. Thus, the transition from middle to older age may be experienced as a stressful, difficult, and sometimes prolonged period of readjustment, necessitating fairly substantial (and frequent) changes in the individual’s life and behavior. This transition period can elicit diverse behavior, with some individuals being unable to adapt to the changes taking place, changes occurring in many areas and often overlapping in time.

Keywords

Mental Health Problem Behavior Mental Health Service Mental Health Problem Behavioral Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry W. Dupree
  • Michael J. O’Sullivan
  • Roger L. Patterson

There are no affiliations available

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