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Production of Interferon in Human Cell Cultures by a New, Potent Viral Inducer

  • Patricia Jameson
  • Sidney E. Grossberg
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 101)

Abstract

A newly discovered double-stranded RNA inducer of interferon, bluetongue virus (BTV), stimulates the production of large amounts of interferon in animals as well as in many types of mammalian cell cultures, including human leukocytes, and continuous cell lines. The exceptional pH lability of BTV and its lack of pathogenicity for man further recommend its use as an interferon inducer. Among several human cell lines tested, the most efficient producer of interferon was a continuous cell line designated HT-1376, derived from a bladder carcinoma. With infectious BTV as the inducer, the HT-1376 line produced more interferon per cell than did leukocytes; interferon yields ranged from 10,000 to 60,000 units per ml of crude, unconcentrated supernatant fluid. Noninfectious BTV, inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation, was as effective as infectious virions. The interferon produced in HT-1376 cells has physico-chemical and antigenic properties resembling those of fibroblast interferon produced in diploid cells.

Keywords

Newcastle Disease Virus Sendai Virus Human Interferon Continuous Cell Line Interferon Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Jameson
    • 1
  • Sidney E. Grossberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyThe Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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