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The Scattering of Atoms and Molecules from Solid Surfaces

  • George WolkenJr.
Part of the Modern Theoretical Chemistry book series (MTC, volume 1)

Abstract

The ill-defined nature of the solid surfaces being studied (and the subsequent nonreproducibility of many experimental results) has in the past made gas-solid processes an unattractive area for theoretical studies. Recently, however, the experimental situation has improved considerably. Various techniques involving electron diffraction [particularly low-energy electron diffraction (LEED)] have emerged as useful tools for monitoring the geometry of the surface; for a review, see Estrup and McRae.(1) Because, in the case of LEED, the energy of the incident electrons is small, the beam probes only the uppermost surface layers of the solid (i.e., electron penetration depths of 3–10 Å). Therefore, structural changes in the uppermost layer due to adsorption or rearrangement of the surface itself are often visible. Auger electron spectroscopy has become a useful tool for identifying surface atoms at very low concentrations.(2) High-energy electrons are used to ionize inner shells of target atoms. The resulting positive ion is often in an excited state and returns to the ground state with emission of a second (Auger) electron. The energy spectrum of the Auger electrons is rather sensitive to the detailed electronic environment these electrons encounter on their way out of the solid. This, in effect, identifies the species encountered. Auger spectroscopy has been perhaps the most widely used of the various techniques based on detection of emitted electrons.

Keywords

Catalysis Helium Tungsten Auger Chemisorption 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • George WolkenJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Battelle, Columbus LaboratoriesColumbusUSA

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