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Left Ventricular Filling in Ischemic and Hypertrophic Heart Disease

  • Robert O. Bonow

Abstract

Impairment of left ventricular diastolic function develops commonly in patients with coronary artery disease or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, stemming from disorders of ventricular relaxation, filling, and distensibility. These factors may contribute substantially to the clinical manifestations of these disease processes. Hence, numerous hemodynamic, angiographic, and noninvasive techniques have been applied to the study of left ventricular diastolic properties. Much attention has been focused recently on the filling phase of diastole, because left ventricular filling lends itself to analysis by noninvasive techniques. The applications and limitations of such analysis are examined in this chapter.

Keywords

Left Ventricular Filling Diastolic Filling Radionuclide Angiography Peak Filling Rate Left Ventricular Relaxation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Martinus Nijhoff Publishing 1987

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  • Robert O. Bonow

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