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Competition in Migrant Birds in the Nonbreeding Season

  • Russell Greenberg
Part of the Current Ornithology book series (CUOR, volume 3)

Abstract

Although it is widely recognized that migration is an adaptation that allows bird populations to exploit seasonal resources, the factors that underly the rich diversity of migration patterns is an area of active research. Predictably, the focus of much of the theory and most of the field work on migration has been the role of competition in shaping the timing and distribution of migration movements. In this review I will examine the theory and evidence for how competition affects the distribution and abundance of migrant birds during the nonbreeding season. I will focus the discussion on migrants that move from high to tropical latitudes, a distribution pattern that probably includes most of the migratory species. In the interest of economy of space, I will examine competition among and within migrant species and leave the overwhelming task of analyzing resident-migrant interactions to future reviewers.

Keywords

Migrant Bird Migrant Species Winter Range Ideal Free Distribution Migration System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell Greenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoological ResearchNational Zoological Park, Smithsonian InstitutionUSA

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