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The Inhibitory Effect of Parvovirus H-1 on Cultured Human Cancer Cells or Transformed Cells

  • Zu-yu Luo
  • Zao-zhong Su
  • Lan-ping Quo
  • Jun-zi Li
  • Ya-lun Liu

Abstract

Hamster osteolytic virus H-l is an autonomous parvovirus. Its genome, consisting of a linear single-stranded DNA molecule of 5176 nucleotides, carries 3 structural genes of capsid and non-capsid protein; the virion replication depends therefore almost completely on the enzyme system of the host cells (1). H-l can inhibit the formation of tumours in experimental animals. For example, infection of Syrian hamster with H-l reduced the incidence of “spontaneous” tumours from 0.05% to 0.0023%, the incidence of tumours induced by the chemical carcinogen DMBA from 95% to 38% (3), and the incidence of tumours induced by adenovirus from 67% to 25% (4), other parvoviruses possess similar functions. The reports from human epidemiological studies indicated that infection by parvovirus lowered significantly the incidence of several cancers (5, 6).

Keywords

Gastric Cancer Cell Syrian Hamster Xeroderma Pigmentosum Primary Gastric Cancer Gastric Cell Line 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zu-yu Luo
    • 1
  • Zao-zhong Su
    • 1
  • Lan-ping Quo
    • 1
  • Jun-zi Li
    • 1
  • Ya-lun Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyFudan UniversityShanghaiPeoples Republic of China

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