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Dietary Choline Deficiency as a New Model to Study the Possible Role of Free Radicals in Acute Cell Injury and in Carcinogenesis

  • Amiya K. Ghoshal
  • T. H. Rushmore
  • D. Ghazarian
  • Amit Ghoshal
  • V. Subrahmanyan
  • E. Farber

Abstract

Over the last few years, working with a diet that is devoid of choline and in methionine (CD) we have observed that when this diet is fed to rats, they develop not only fatty liver, but also hepatocellular necrosis and cancer. In the course of our investigation as to the mechanism of cancer development by a dietary deficiency without any added carcinogen, we found that early nuclear lipid peroxidation (1), DNA alteration (2) and cell proliferation are very common features in the liver. Free radical generation and DNA alteration in a proliferating organ has been proposed as the initiating event in the development of liver cancer (see Fig. 1). However, the nature of free radical generated and the nature of DNA alteration are not known.

Keywords

Lipid Peroxidation Electron Spin Resonance Free Radical Generation Diene Conjugate Prevent Lipid Peroxidation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amiya K. Ghoshal
    • 1
  • T. H. Rushmore
    • 1
  • D. Ghazarian
    • 1
  • Amit Ghoshal
    • 1
  • V. Subrahmanyan
    • 1
  • E. Farber
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Pathology and of Biochemistry Medical Sciences BuildingUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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