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The Mask of Theory and the Face of Nature

  • Marcy F. Lawton
  • William R. Garstka
  • J. Craig Hanks

Abstract

Thousands of years ago in Greece, shepherds looked out at a spray of stars in the night sky and imagined a meaningful shape. They saw in the sky something they worried about and named the constellation we call Leo for the lion that stalked their flocks. The pattern they fit to the face of nature was drawn from their cultural matrix. Today, when we look at the night sky, we see the same pattern and teach our children how to see it.

Keywords

Gender Bias Sperm Storage Cooperative Breeding Alpha Male Communal Breeding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcy F. Lawton
  • William R. Garstka
  • J. Craig Hanks

There are no affiliations available

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