High-Functioning People with Autism and Asperger Syndrome

A Literature Review
  • Christopher Gillberg
  • Stephan Ehlers
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

The number of papers on Asperger syndrome (AS) and high-functioning autism (HFA) is growing at a fast pace. At least 140 articles have appeared in the English language over the last 14 years. More than two-thirds of these were published in the last 5 years. This chapter aims to review (1) the history of AS and HFA, (2) current diagnostic concepts and criteria, (3) some of the controversial issues pertaining to diagnosis, and then to (4) selectively review the studies in the field with a view to identifying possible unifying/differentiating features of these two disorders. Finally, there is also a brief section on intervention guidelines based mostly on the authors’ many years of clinical experience with individuals with HFA/AS.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Gillberg
    • 1
  • Stephan Ehlers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryAnnedals ClinicsGöteborgSweden

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