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Expression and Processing of Nonstructural Proteins of the Human Astroviruses

  • C. A. Gibson
  • J. Chen
  • S. A. Monroe
  • M. R. Denison
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 440)

Abstract

The human astroviruses (HAst) are increasingly recognized as an important cause of gastroenteritis. These viruses contain a 6.8-kb positive-sense, single-stranded RNA molecule that is infectious when transfected into permissive cells. The HAst gene 1 is composed of two open reading frames (ORFs 1a and 1b) connected by a ribosomal frameshift. Gene 1 is predicted to encode two nonstructural polyproteins (pp1a and pp1ab), and analysis of the HAs gene 1 sequence has resulted in predictions of a serine proteinase within the ORF1a polyprotein. However, none of the gene 1 proteins have been identified. To examine the expression and processing of the HAst2 gene 1 polyprotein, we have translated pp1a and pp1ab in vitro. These ongoing studies will provide the foundation for correlating gene 1 expression in vitro with proteins expressed in virus-infected cells.

Keywords

Nonstructural Protein Permissive Cell Ribosomal Frameshift Antigenic Domain eDNA Clone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. A. Gibson
    • 1
    • 3
  • J. Chen
    • 4
  • S. A. Monroe
    • 4
  • M. R. Denison
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyVanderbilt UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsVanderbilt UniversityUSA
  3. 3.Elizabeth B. Lamb Center for Pediatric ResearchVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA
  4. 4.Centers for Disease ControlAtlantaUSA

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