Advertisement

Intestinal Microvascular PO2 Measurement with Pd-Porphyrin Phosphorescence in the Mechanically Ventilated Mouse

  • J. van Bommel
  • M. A. W. Maas
  • M. Sinaasappel
  • C. Ince
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 454)

Abstract

Investigations into the determinants of oxygen transport to tissue in mice can be expected to provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue oxygenation. This approach has two main advantages: it enables the use of genetically modified mice in which, depending on the objective of study, specific molecular mechanisms can be modified and it enables access to a multitude of commercially available kits for assessment of inflammatory mediators specifically developed for the mouse. In order to study mechanisms related to cardiovascular function, physiological measurement techniques will have to be developed specifically for the mouse to enable measurement of parameters providing information about macroscopic hemodynamics as well as the oxygenation of the microcirculation. Because of its sensitivity to dysoxia and its inflammatory potential we first focused on the gut. In this study we present results from hemodynamic measurements (arterial blood pressure and blood flow in aorta) in combination with microvascular pO2 measurement in the gut of anesthetized and mechanically ventilated mice undergoing hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation.

Keywords

Arterial Blood Pressure Hemorrhagic Shock Oxygen Transport Transonic Flow Crystalloid Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Sinaasappel M., Ince C.; Calibration of Pd-Porphyrin phosphorescence for oxygen concentration measurements in vivo. Journal of Applied Physiology 81(5):2297–2303, 1996PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dalkara T., Irikura K., Huang Z., Panahian N., Moskowitz M.A.; Cerebrovascular response under controlled and monitored physiological conditions in the anesthetized mouse. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 15(4):631–638, 1995PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Wang P., Ba Z., Burkhardt J., Chaudry I.H.; Trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation in the mouse: effects on cardiac output and organ blood flow. American Journal of Physiology 264(33): H1166–H1173, 1993PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Iterson M. van, Sinaasappel M., Trouwborst A., Ince C.; Gut pO2 measured by Pd-Porphinc phosphorescence in pigs during moderate shock. Intensive Care Medicine 22(S3): S441, 1996Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. van Bommel
    • 1
  • M. A. W. Maas
    • 2
  • M. Sinaasappel
    • 1
  • C. Ince
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiologyAcademic Medical Centre University of AmsterdamNetherlands
  2. 2.Department of Experimental Internal MedicineAcademic Medical Centre University of AmsterdamMeibergdreef 9Netherlands

Personalised recommendations