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Noninvasive Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Fluids Using an Ultrasonic Interferometry Technique

  • W. Han
  • D. N. Sinha
  • K. N. Springer
  • D. C. Lizon

Abstract

Ultrasonic propagation provides a useful approach for extracting physicochemical properties of fluids. Traditional ultrasonic techniques for the measurement of sound attenuation and sound speed in fluids primarily include resonance reverberation, pulse-echo, and ultrasonic interferometry. of these techniques, ultrasonic interferometry stands out for its ability to provide frequency-dependent measurements and for its ability to work with small liquid samples1–3. Eggers and Kaatze1 give a recent comprehensive review on this subject. Unfortunately, this technique requires the transducers to be in direct contact with the test fluid, thereby limiting the applicability of this technique primarily to precision laboratory fluid characterization. For industrial and other practical applications, it is important to be able to characterize fluids in containers without requiring the transducers to be in direct contact with the fluid inside. Such noninvasive fluid characterization was recently demonstrated by Sinha et al.4 who adapted the ultrasonic interferometry technique for noninvasive measurements to identify chemicals inside sealed metal containers.

Keywords

Attenuation Coefficient Sound Speed Acoustic Impedance Acoustic Property Noninvasive Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. 1.
    F. Eggers and U. Kaatze, “Broad-band ultrasonic measurement techniques for liquids”, Meas. Sci. Technol., 7, 1–19 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    W. Han, D.N. Sinha, K.N. Springer and D.C. Lizon, “An ultrasonic interferometry method for noninvasive determination of acoustic properties in liquids”, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., submitted for publication.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Han
    • 1
  • D. N. Sinha
    • 1
  • K. N. Springer
    • 1
  • D. C. Lizon
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronic and Electrochemical Materials & Devices Group, MS D429Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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