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Fructose Malabsorption is Associated with Decreased Plasma Tryptophan

  • M. Ledochowski
  • B. Widner
  • T. Propst-Braunsteiner
  • W. Vogel
  • B. Sperner-Unterweger
  • D. Fuchs
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 467)

Abstract

Fructose malabsorption is characterized by the inability to absorb fructose efficiently. Consequently fructose reaches the colon and is broken down by bacteria to short-fatty-acids, CO2 and H2. Recently we found that fructose malabsorption was associated with signs of depression. It was therefore of interest to find out whether fructose malabsorption is associated with abnormal tryptophan metabolism. Breath hydrogen concentrations were measured in 50 after an oral dose of 50g fructose allowing to classify them as normals (n = 15) or fructose malabsorbers (n = 35). Blood samples were taken for tryptophan and kynurenine measurements. Fructose malabsorbers showed significantly lower plasma tryptophan concentrations and significantly higher depression scores compared to normals. Fructose malabsorption is associated with lower tryptophan levels which may play a role in the development of depressive disorders.

Keywords

High Performance Liquid Chromatography Irritable Bowel Syndrome Acute Tryptophan Depletion Premenstrual Syndrome Tryptophan Depletion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ledochowski
    • 1
  • B. Widner
    • 2
  • T. Propst-Braunsteiner
    • 1
  • W. Vogel
    • 1
  • B. Sperner-Unterweger
    • 3
  • D. Fuchs
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria
  2. 2.Institute for Medical Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria

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