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An Ecological-Transactional Model of Child Maltreatment

  • Dante Cicchetti
  • Sheree L. Toth
  • Angeline Maughan

Abstract

Although community efforts to protect America’s children have grown, the stark reality that confronts us as a nation is that 1 out of every 43 children in the United States has experienced some form of maltreatment at the hands of a parent or primary caregiver. More alarming, according to the National Incidence Study completed in 1993 (NIS-III; United States Department of Health and Human Services, 1996), since 1980, the American public has witnessed and/or contributed to a 149% increase in the number of children reported for alleged maltreatment, with estimates rising from 625,100 to more than 15 million children nationally. When the definition of maltreatment is expanded to include children at risk for maltreatment who may not yet have suffered harm, estimates rise to over 2.8 million cases nationwide. Out of these 1993 incident reports, 1,500 children died due to fatal wounds and over 36% of these children experienced serious injuries (i.e., loss of consciousness, stopping breathing, broken bones, and/or third-degree bums).

Keywords

Child Maltreatment Child Development Adolescent Psychiatry Insecure Attachment Attachment Relationship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dante Cicchetti
    • 1
  • Sheree L. Toth
    • 1
  • Angeline Maughan
    • 1
  1. 1.Mt. Hope Family CenterUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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