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Prevalence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Arcobacter Species at Slaughter in Market Age Pigs

  • Roger B. Harvey
  • Robin C. Anderson
  • Colin R. Young
  • Michael E. Hume
  • Kenneth J. Genovese
  • Richard L. Ziprin
  • Leigh A. Farrington
  • Larry H. Stanker
  • David J. Nisbet
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 473)

Summary

A survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Arcobacter species in market age pigs from an integrated swine operation in Texas. Our findings indicate that farms from this commercial operation were heavily contaminated with Campylobacter and Salmonella, that the isolation rates of C. jejuni were higher than predicted, and that there was a low prevalence of Arcobacter.

Keywords

Isolation Rate Commercial Operation Cecal Content Pork Sausage Replacement Gilt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roger B. Harvey
    • 1
  • Robin C. Anderson
    • 1
  • Colin R. Young
    • 1
  • Michael E. Hume
    • 1
  • Kenneth J. Genovese
    • 2
  • Richard L. Ziprin
    • 1
  • Leigh A. Farrington
    • 2
  • Larry H. Stanker
    • 1
  • David J. Nisbet
    • 1
  1. 1.Food Animal Protection Research LaboratoryUSDA, ARSCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.College of Veterinary MedicineTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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