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The Forms of Women’s Work

  • Robert L. Kahn
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

This paper has four aims: (1) to propose the concept of productive activity as an alternative to conventional definitions of work, (2) to compare the patterns of productive activity of men and women throughout the life course, (3) to consider factors associated with those patterns as hypothetical causes or effects, (4) to discuss some implications of these findings for policy, especially with respect to national statistics.

Keywords

Child Care Productive Activity Volunteer Work Unskilled Worker Unpaid Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Kahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Survey Research Center, Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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