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The Enigma of Drought

  • Donald A. Wilhite
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 2)

Abstract

Drought is the most complex and least understood of all natural hazards, affecting more people than any other hazard (Hagman, 1984). For the past several decades, we have been reminded again and again of the ravages of drought and the inability of most societies to effectively mitigate impacts in the short term and reduce vulnerability in the longer term. In fact, most scientists would agree that vulnerability to drought is increasing for a number of reasons, the most important of which may be the increasing pressure of an expanding population base on limited water and other natural resources.

Keywords

United Nations Environment Program Palmer Drought Severity Index World Meteorological Organization Meteorological Drought Agricultural Drought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald A. Wilhite

There are no affiliations available

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