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Bioavailability of Intravenous Formulations of P-Boronophenylalanine in Dog and Rat

  • T. R. LaHann
  • D. R. Lu
  • G. Daniell
  • C. Sills
  • S. L. Kraft
  • P. R. Gavin
  • W. F. Bauer

Abstract

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is being developed as a treatment for malignant melanoma. P-boronophenyialanine (BPA) was initially proposed as a boron (B) delivery drug for BNCT of malignant melanoma because it was postulated that this B-containing amino acid, by mimicking a melanin precursor, would selectively accumulate in melanoma cells. BPA does seem to selectively accumulate in melanocytes, apparently as a result of uptake by an amino acid transport system1. For successful BNCT, tumor B concentrations of at least 20 ppm are thought to be necessary, but higher tumor B levels are desirable. Calculations2 indicate that for a given neutron exposure, each doubling of the tumor B concentration should increase tumor cell kill by a factor of about 10,000. Thus, even modest increases in the amount of B in tumor cells can dramatically improve the effectiveness of BNCT as a cancer treatment.

Keywords

Melanoma Cell Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Peak Serum Level Amino Acid Transport System Neutron Exposure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. R. LaHann
  • D. R. Lu
  • G. Daniell
  • C. Sills
    • 1
  • S. L. Kraft
    • 2
  • P. R. Gavin
    • 3
  • W. F. Bauer
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Toxicology Research, Department of Pharmaceutical SciencesIdaho State UniversityPocatelloUSA
  2. 2.College of Veterinary MedicineKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  3. 3.College of Veterinary MedicineWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  4. 4.Idaho National Engineering LaboratoryIdaho FallsUSA

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