Identifying Survivors at Risk

Trauma and Stressors across Events
  • Bonnie L. Green

Abstract

A great deal of interest has been recently paid to symptoms and diagnoses that follow exposure to events that are outside of the normal range. In particular, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) entered the psychiatric nomenclature in 1980 ([APA]) and was somewhat modified with the revision of the third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) in 1987 (DSM-III-R, APA, 1987). However, the earlier versions of the DSM also contained diagnoses related to stress, and such symptoms and diagnoses have long been acknowledged, particularly in association with wartime experience (Trimble, 1981). Recent work by Horowitz and his colleagues (Horowitz, 1986; Horowitz, Weiss, & Marmar, 1987) has suggested a generic category of “stressresponse syndromes” that may arise following a variety of individual and collective events including bereavement.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonnie L. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryGeorgetown University HospitalWashingtonUSA

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