Neurological Effects of Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Radiation

  • Henry Lai

Abstract

Many reports in the literature have suggested the effect of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFR) (10 kHz-300,000 MHz) on the functions of the nervous system. Such effects are of great concern to researchers in bioelectromagnetics, since the nervous system coordinates and controls an organism’s responses to the environment through autonomic and voluntary muscular movements and neurohumoral functions. As it was suggested in the early stages of bioelectromagnetics research, behavioral changes could be the most sensitive effects of RFR exposure. At the summary of session B of the proceedings of an international symposium held in Warsaw, Poland, in 1973, it was stated that “The reaction of the central nervous system to microwaves may serve as an early indicator of disturbances in regulatory functions of many systems” [Czerski et al., 1974].

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry Lai
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and Center for BioengineeringUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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