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Microbiological Spoilage and Pathogens in Minimally Processed Refrigerated Fruits and Vegetables

  • Robert E. Brackett

Abstract

Minimally processed refrigerated (MPR) fruits and vegetables have always been an important food group in the diet. However, consumers have recently become more aware of the importance of these products in maintaining health. Consequently, consumers are purchasing and eating more fresh produce and demanding a greater variety of these products in the marketplace. This has led food processors to take advantage of modern technology and transportation to satisfy the consumer’s demand. Despite improved methods of maintaining quality and shelf-life of MPR produce, a limiting factor to optimum quality is the same as before. That component is the role of microorganisms in the spoilage and safety of MPR produce.

Keywords

Listeria Monocytogenes Fresh Fruit Fresh Produce Modify Atmosphere Packaging Foodborne Pathogen 
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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

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  • Robert E. Brackett

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