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Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Fruits and Vegetables

  • William D. Powrie
  • Brent J. Skura

Abstract

Consumer appeal for fresh, low-calorie, healthy, nutritious and high quality foods has grown steadily in the last 10 years. Such food trends may be attributed to consumer attitudes on lifestyle, nutrition, fitness, health and food quality [7, 103, 128, 239]. The 1990 Grocery Attitudes of Canadians study [104] indicated that 68% of grocery shoppers considered nutrition as extremely or very important. North Americans are concerned about foods in their diet in relation to weight control and chronic disease risks. Government agencies and health-promoting organizations are recommending a reduction of fat, cholesterol and salt in the diet and a greater consumption of fruits, vegetables and cereals with the view that such dietary changes may reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer incidence [7, 285]. Fresh commodities are now considered by consumers to be more nutritious than canned products and more flavourful [128].

Keywords

Ethylene Production Fresh Fruit Krebs Cycle Middle Lamella Modify Atmosphere Packaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ellis Horwood Limited 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • William D. Powrie
    • 1
  • Brent J. Skura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of British ColumbiaCanada

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