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Factors Controlling Coronavirus Infections and Disease of the Central Nervous System

A Review
  • S. Dales
Chapter
  • 216 Downloads
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 380)

Abstract

This review summarizes 18 years of investigations in this laboratory on factors controlling the infectious process in cells of the central nervous system (CNS). The model chosen by us which involves rodents challenged with neurotropic murine coronavirus (CV) JHMV, was selected on the presumption that pathogenesis due to viral infections can be a trigger for sequelae culminating in autoimmune disease like that presumed to cause multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans. Our model, based on the initial 1949 reports about initiation of neurologic disease in rats and mice by JHMV1,2 has been refined and amplified upon3. More recent evidence, which includes detection of viral RNA and protein in neural cells some albeit circumstantial, has implicated both the rodent and ubiquitous human OC43 or 229E CVs in CNS pathologies including demyelinative disease4,5. The key interrelated parameters relevant to the model examined by us which will be considered here include the influence of age and development of the host animal, its immune responses, genetic constitution and variability of the infecting viral agent. For the sake of clarity, realizing that it may be an oversimplification, CNS infections associated primarily with neurons (NEU) are designated as grey matter (GM) disease while those involving glial cells, especially astrocytes (AS) and oligodendrocytes (OL), which cause demyelinative lesions are termed white matter (WM) disease.

Keywords

Central Nervous System Infection Companion Article White Matter Disease Central Nervous System Pathology Grey Matter Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Dales
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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