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Abstract

relative time period: Initial in the local sequence, precedes the Kodiak (Kachemak) tradition. Early Ocean Bay arose within or was a part of the Anangula-Chaluka transition phase (7800–4000 b.p. uncalibrated carbon-14 years) of the eastern Aleutian islands

Keywords

Harbor Seal Projectile Point Alaska Peninsula Outer Coast Early Ocean 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

  1. Clark, Donald W. (1979). Ocean Bay: An Early North Pacific Maritime Culture. National Museum of Man, Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 86. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.Google Scholar
  2. Clark, Donald W. (1982). “An Example of Technological Change in Prehistory: The Origin of a Regional Ground Slate Industry in South-Central Coastal Alaska.” Arctic Anthropology 19 (1): 103–126.Google Scholar
  3. Clark, Gerald H. (1977). Archaeology of the Alaska Peninsula: The Coast of Shelikof Strait 1963–1965. University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, No. 13. Eugene: Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.Google Scholar
  4. Dumond, Don E. (1971). A Summary of Archaeology in the Katmai Region, Southwestern Alaska. University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, No. 2. Eugene: Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.Google Scholar
  5. Dumond, Don D. (1987). The Eskimos and Aleuts. 2nd ed. London: Thames and Hudon.Google Scholar
  6. Fitzhugh, J. Benjamin (1996). “The Evolution of Complex Hunter- Gatherers in the North Pacific: An Archaeological Case Study from Kodiak Island, Alaska.” Ph.D. diss., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
  7. Hausler-Kmecht, Philomena (1993). “Early Prehistory of the Kodiak Archipelago.” Paper presented at International Seminar on the Origins, Development, and Spread of Prehistoric North Pacific-Bering Sea Maritime Cultures. Honolulu.Google Scholar
  8. Heusser, C. J. (1960). Late-Pleistocene Environments of North Pacific North America. American Geographical Society Special Publication, 35. New York: American Geographical Society.Google Scholar
  9. Nelson, Robert E., and Richard H. Jordan (1988). “A Postglacial Pollen Record from Western Kodiak Island, Alaska.” Arctic 41 (1): 59–63.Google Scholar
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Reference

  1. Dumond, Don E. Archaeology on the Alaska Peninsula: The Naknek Region, 1960–1975. University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, No. 21. Eugene: Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.Google Scholar

References

  1. Workman, William (1996). “Human Colonizations of the Cook Inlet Basin before 3000 Years Ago.” In Adventures through Time: Readings in the Anthropology of Cook Inlet, Alaska, ed. N. Y. Davis and W. E. Davis. Anchorage: Cook Inlet Historical Society, 37–48.Google Scholar
  2. Workman, William B., Janet Klein, Mariene Testaguzza, and Peter Zollars (1993). “1992 Test Excavations at the Sylva Site (SEL 245): A Stratified Late Ocean Bay Occupation in Upper Kachemak Bay, Kenai Peninsula.” Paper presented at the 20th annual meeting of the Alaska Anthropological Association, Anchorage.Google Scholar

References

  1. Clark, Donald W. (1979). Ocean Bay. An Early North Pacific Maritime Culture. National Museum of Man, Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 86. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.Google Scholar
  2. Clark, Donald W. (1982). “An Example of Technological Change in Prehistory: The Origin of a Regional Ground Slate Industry in South-Central Coastal Alaska.” Arctic Anthropology 19 (1): 103–126.Google Scholar
  3. Fitzhugh, J. Benjamin (1996). “The Evolution of Complex Hunter-Gatherers in the North Pacific: An Archaeological Case Study from Kodiak Island, Alaska.” Ph.D. diss., Ann Arbor: University of Michigan.Google Scholar
  4. Hausler-Knecht, Philomena (1993). “Early Prehistory of the Kodiak Archipelago.” Paper presented at International Seminar on the Origins, Development, and Spread of Prehistoric North Pacific-Bearing Sea Maritime Cultures. Honolulu.Google Scholar
  5. Heusser, C. J. (1960). Late-Pleistocene Environments of North Pacific North America. American Geographical Society Special Publication, 35. New York: American Geographical Society.Google Scholar

References

  1. Clark, Donald W. (1979). Ocean Bay: An Early North Pacific Maritime Culture. National Museum of Man Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 86. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.Google Scholar
  2. Clark, Donald W. (1982). “An Example of Technological Change in Prehistory: The Origin of a Regional Ground Slate Industry in South-Central Coastal Alaska.” Arctic Anthropology 19 (1): 103– 126.Google Scholar

Reference

  1. Clark, Gerald H. (1977). Archaeology of the Alaska Peninsula: The Coast of Shelikof Strait 1963–1965. University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, No. 13. Eugene: Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.Google Scholar

References

  1. Townsend, Joan B., and Sam-Joe Townsend (1961). “Archaeological Investigations at Pedro Bay, Alaska.” Anthropological Papers of the University of Alaska 10 (1): 25–58.Google Scholar
  2. Townsend, Joan B. (1970). “The Pedro Bay Site, Iliamna Lake,Alaska.” Paper presented at the 35th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Mexico.Google Scholar

Reference

  1. Hausler-Knecht, Philomena (1993). “Early Prehistory of the Kodiak Archipelago.” Paper presented at the International seminar on the origin, Development, and spread of Prehistoric North Pacific-Bering Sea Maritime Cultures, Honolulu.Google Scholar

References

  1. Clark, Donald W. (1979). Ocean Bay: An Early North Pacific Maritime Culture. National Museum of Man Mercury Series, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper, No. 86. Ottawa: National Museum of Man.Google Scholar
  2. Clark, Donald W. (1982). “An Example of Technological Change in Prehistory: The Origin of a Regional Ground Slate Industry in South-Central Coastal Alaska.” Arctic Anthropology 19 (1): 103–126.Google Scholar

Reference

  1. Clark, Gerald H. (1977). Archaeology of the Alaska Peninsula: The Coast of Shelikof Strait 1963–1965. University of Oregon Anthropological Papers, No. 13. Eugene: Department of Anthropology, University of Oregon.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.NepeanCanada

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