X-linked lymphoproliferative disease: the dark side of 2b4 function

  • Cristina Bottino
  • Silvia Parolini
  • Roberto Biassoni
  • Michela Falco
  • Luigi Notarangelo
  • Alessandro Moretta
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 495)

Abstract

A series of different receptor/ligand interactions are responsible for HLA class I-independent NK cell activation in humans. In this context, three NK­specific triggering receptors termed NKp46 (1,2), NKp44 (3,4) and NKp30 (5) have been identified, and termed Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR)(6). These receptors play a predominant role in NK cell activation in the process of natural cytotoxicity. Importantly, heterogeneity exists among different NK cells in their surface density of NCR. Thus, NCRbngntand NCRbngnt and NCRd;“ NK cells were shown to display sharp differences in the ability to kill a panel of NK susceptible target cells. In particular, the strong cytolytic activity correlates with the expression of the NCRL tphenotype whereas the expression of the NCR”’ phenotype is invariably associated with a low cytolytic activity of NK cells (7).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristina Bottino
    • 1
  • Silvia Parolini
    • 2
  • Roberto Biassoni
    • 1
  • Michela Falco
    • 3
  • Luigi Notarangelo
    • 4
  • Alessandro Moretta
    • 3
  1. 1.Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul CancroGenovaItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e BiotecnologieUniversità di BresciaBresciaItaly
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Medicina SperimentaleUniversità di GenovaGenovaItaly
  4. 4.lstituto di Medicina Molecolare Angelo Nocivelli, Clinica pediatricaUniversità di BresciaBresciaItaly

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