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Adult Development and the Practice of Psychotherapy

  • Michael Basseches
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

This chapter explores the implications of the field of adult development for the practice of psychotherapy. The study of adult development has transformed developmental psychology from the study of child development into a lifespan developmental psychology, now capable of offering a viable alternative frame of reference for psychotherapy practice to traditional conceptual frameworks rooted in the fields of psychiatry and clinical psychology. This chapter asks: In what ways does using lifespan developmental psychology as one’s primary conceptual frame of reference lead to differences in approaches to psychotherapy practice with adult clients, and/or to the training and supervision of adult psychotherapy practitioners?

Keywords

Developmental Perspective Psychological Organization Adult Development Adult Client Mental Health Expert 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Basseches
    • 1
  1. 1.Bureau of Study CounselHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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