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Discursive Practices and Their Interpretation in the Psychology of Religious Development

From Constructivist Canons to Constructionist Alternatives
  • James M. Day
  • Deborah J. Youngman
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners interested in the varied dimensions of human religious conduct at any point in the lifespan owe a particular debt to those who, inspired by Jean Piaget and Lawrence Kohlberg, brought the study of religious development into the mainstream of the psychology of religion and the psychology of human development.

Keywords

Moral Judgment Moral Development Religious Experience Discursive Practice Narrative Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Day
    • 1
  • Deborah J. Youngman
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Psychology and Educational SciencesUniversite catholique de LouvainLouvain-la-NeuveBelgium
  2. 2.Department of Developmental Studies and CounselingBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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