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Nature Read in Truth or Flaw

Locating Alternatives in Evolutionary Psychology
  • Steven J. Scher
  • Frederick Rauscher

Abstract

Evolutionary psychology is a powerful new methodology in psychology. Its practitioners claim success in reading human nature where previous methods in psychology have failed. But whether nature is read in truth or with flaws depends in part on a serious study of the exact methods used in evolutionary psychology.

Keywords

Natural Selection Evolutionary Theory Evolutionary Psychology Psychological Mechanism Inclusive Fitness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Scher
  • Frederick Rauscher

There are no affiliations available

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