Data Analysis on Location-Based Social Networks

Chapter
Part of the Computational Social Sciences book series (CSS)

Abstract

The rapid growth of location-based social networks (LBSNs) has greatly enriched people’s urban experience through social media, and attracted increasing number of users in recent years. Typical location-based social networking sites allow users to “check in” at a physical place and share the location with their online friends, and therefore bridge the gap between the real world and online social networks. The availability of large amounts of geographical and social data on LBSNs provides an unprecedented opportunity to study human mobile behavior through data analysis in a spatial–temporal–social context, enabling a variety of location-based services, from mobile marketing to disaster relief. In this chapter, we first introduce the background and framework of location-based mobile social networking. We next discuss the distinct properties, data analysis and research issues of location-based social networks, and present two illustrative examples to show the application of data mining to real-world location-based social networks.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computer Science and Engineering, Arizona State UniversityPhoenixUSA

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