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The Impact of Mammography Screening on the Diagnosis and Management of Early-Phase Breast Cancer

  • László Tabár
  • Peter B. Dean
  • Tony Hsiu-Hsi Chen
  • Amy Ming-Fang Yen
  • Sherry Yueh-Hsia Chiu
  • Tibor Tot
  • Robert A. Smith
  • Stephen W. Duffy
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the conflicting theories concerning better control of breast cancer. The evidence from randomized controlled trials and service screening, based upon individualized patient data, overwhelmingly confirms that detection and treatment of breast cancer at an earlier phase have accomplished a significantly reduced mortality from the disease. The revolution in breast imaging and its impact upon breast cancer management, despite the unquestionable benefits, have incited a debate over the perceived benefits and risks of current practice. The pros and cons of this ongoing debate are carefully analyzed in this chapter. As breast cancer is detected at an ever-earlier phase, the complexity of the disease challenges the current terminology and necessitates the diagnostic and therapeutic team members to reevaluate the standards of care, which have been based upon palpable, advanced breast cancer. Better correlation of imaging with histopathology necessitates large-section histopathology technique to provide a more reliable determination of surgical margins, tumor extent, and especially demonstration of the multifocal and diffusely infiltrating forms of breast cancer. Adding the mammographic tumor features to the current histologic prognostic features improves the prediction of long-term patient outcome and facilitates treatment planning.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Invasive Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Screening Mammography Screening Breast Cancer Mortality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • László Tabár
    • 1
  • Peter B. Dean
    • 2
  • Tony Hsiu-Hsi Chen
    • 3
  • Amy Ming-Fang Yen
    • 4
  • Sherry Yueh-Hsia Chiu
    • 5
  • Tibor Tot
    • 6
  • Robert A. Smith
    • 7
  • Stephen W. Duffy
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of MammographyFalun Central HospitalFalunSweden
  2. 2.Department of Diagnostic RadiologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive MedicineNational Taiwan UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  4. 4.School of Oral HygieneTaipei Medical UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  5. 5.Department and Graduate Institute of Health Care ManagementChang Gung UniversityTaoyuanTaiwan
  6. 6.Department of Clinical PathologyCentral Hospital FalunFalunSweden
  7. 7.Cancer Control Science DepartmentAmerican Cancer SocietyAtlantaUSA
  8. 8.Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive MedicineQueen Mary UniversityLondonUK

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