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Modular Function Deployment: Using Module Drivers to Impart Strategies to a Product Architecture

  • Mark W. LangeEmail author
  • Andrea Imsdahl
Chapter

Abstract

Products reflect the needs of many different entities. People such as end-users and re-sellers, regulating bodies of authority, and individuals within manufacturing and engineering provide statements as “voices” that impact the physical structure of a product in different ways. A company establishes a strategy to realize the product that responds to these “voices.” There are various approaches to capturing a singular “voice of x” when realizing a product architecture. Modular function deployment differs from other architecture methods by providing a holistic approach to capturing multiple “voices” as a company strategy through the use of Module Drivers. This approach is demonstrated by actual industrial examples that explore the flexibility of Module Drivers applied in the creation of a conceptual modular product architecture.

Keywords

Product Family Business Strategy Quality Function Deployment Product Platform Product Leadership 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Applied Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering and ManagementRoyal Institute of TechnologySödertäljeSweden

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