Advertisement

Sex

  • James Binder
Chapter
  • 813 Downloads

Abstract

The following basic interviewing tools are prerequisites to participating in role plays for inquiring about sex: Open-ended inquiries , eliciting and responding to feelings, self-awareness , uncovering health beliefs, persistence and clarification, transitional statements , and normalization .

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Transmitted Disease Romantic Relationship Sexual Functioning Sexual Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Supplementary material

(MP4 20518 kb)

(MP4 40757 kb)

References

  1. 1.
    Epstein RM, Morse DS, Frankel RM, Frarey L, Anderson K, Beckman HB. Awkward moments in patient-physician communication about HIV risk. Ann Intern Med. 1998;128:435–47.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ende J, Rockwell S, Glasgow M. The sexual history in general medical practice. Arch Intern Med. 1984;144:558–61.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Platt FW, Gordon GH. Field guide to the difficult patient interview. 2nd ed. Williams and Wilkins, PA: Lippincott; 2004.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Frankel RM, Williams S, Edwardsen E. Asking about sexuality. In: Novack DH, Clark WD, Daetwyler C, Saizow DB, editors. doc.com – an interactive learning resource for healthcare communication [Internet]. Philadelphia, PA: American Academy on Communication in Healthcare/Drexel University College of Medicine. Accessed 10 May 2012. http://www.AACHonline.org.
  5. 5.
    Williams S. The sexual history. In: Lipkin M, Putnam S, Lazare A, editors. The medical interview: clinical care education and research. New York, NY: Springer; 1995.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Rollnick S, Miller WR, Butler CC. Motivational interviewing in health care: helping patients change behavior. New York, NY: The Guilford Press; 2008.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lief HI, Berman EM. Sexual interviewing throughout the patient’s cycle. In: Lief HI, editor. Sexual problems in medical practice. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association; 1981.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ginsberg K. The adolescent interview. In: Novack DH, Clark WD, Daetwyler C, Saizow DB, editors. doc.com – an interactive learning resource for healthcare communication [Internet]. Philadelphia, PA: American Academy on Communication in healthcare/Drexel University College of Medicine. Accessed 17 Mar 2012. http://www.AACHonline.org.
  9. 9.
    Millstein S, Irwin C, Adler N, Cohn L, Kegeles S, Dolcini M. Health-risk behaviors and health concerns among young adolescents. Pediatrics. 1992;89:422–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Maehr J, Felice M. Eleven to fourteen years: early adolescence age of rapid changes. In: Dixon SD, Stein MT, editors. Encounters with children: pediatric behavior and development. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2006.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Maehr J, Felice M. Fifteen to seventeen years: mid adolescence – redefining self. In: Dixon SD, Stein MT, editors. Encounters with children: pediatric behavior and development. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2006.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Little KJ. Screening for domestic violence: identifying, assisting, and empowering adult victims of abuse. Postgrad Med. 2000;108:135–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Binder
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Cabin Creek Health SystemsDawesUSA
  2. 2.Marshall University School of MedicineHuntingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations