Advertisement

Incorporating Users into AmI System Design: From Requirements Toward Automation

  • Estefanía SerralEmail author
  • Luca Sabatucci
  • Chiara Leonardi
  • Pedro Valderas
  • Angelo Susi
  • Massimo Zancanaro
  • Vicente Pelechano
Conference paper

Abstract

The term ambient intelligence (AmI) is still a vision of the future of consumer electronics in which the computational power is embedded in everyday appliances and physical objects to turn environments into sensitive places able to understand users’ needs and to automate their daily tasks (Weiser 1995). In the context of AmI, task automation is central and raises many challenges since the system must adapt to each individual’s specific needs. These challenges become even more critical when the domain is characterized by the presence of many actors, every one owning different institutional roles, responsibilities, skills, and motivations (Cook et al. 2003). In addition, since users’ preferences may change in time, it is also important that the developed system provides evolution facilities for adapting to new requirements; otherwise, the system may become useless, obsolete, or perceived as intrusive by final users. It is therefore of paramount importance to use requirements engineering techniques for the analysis of users’ needs and for involving users to participate in design and development choices (Rolland and Salinesi 2009, Van Lamsweerde 2003).

References

  1. Bresciani P, Perini A, Giorgini P, Giunchiglia F, Mylopoulos J (2004) Tropos: an agent-oriented software development methodology. In: Proceedngs of the AAMAS. IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, pp 203–236Google Scholar
  2. Casas R, Blasco Marín R, Robinet A, Delgado A, Yarza A, McGinn J, Picking R, Grout V (2008) User modelling in ambient intelligence for elderly and disabled people. In: Proceedngs of the computers helping people with special needs. Springer, Berlin/New York, pp 114–122Google Scholar
  3. Cockburn A (2001) Writing effective use cases, vol 1. Addison-Wesley, BostonGoogle Scholar
  4. Cook DJ, Youngblood M, Heierman IEO, Gopalratnam K, Rao S, Litvin A, Khawaja F (2003) Mavhome: an agent-based smart home. In: Proceedings of the PerCom. IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, pp 521–524Google Scholar
  5. Cooper A, Reimann R, Cronin D (2007) About face 3: the essentials of interaction design. Wiley, IndianapolisGoogle Scholar
  6. Dardenne A, Lamsweerde A, Fickas S (1993) Goal-directed requirements acquisition. Sci Comput Program 20(1–2):3–50Google Scholar
  7. Dey AK (2001) Understanding and using context. PUCGoogle Scholar
  8. Hagras H, Callaghan V, Colley M, Clarke G, Pounds-Cornish A, Duman H (2004) Creating an ambient-intelligence environment using embedded agents. IEEE Intel Syst 19(6):12–20Google Scholar
  9. Johnson P (1999) Tasks and situations: considerations for models and design principles in human computer interaction. In: Proceedings of the HCI international. Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah/London, pp 1199–1204Google Scholar
  10. Kolos-Mazuryk L, Eck P, Wieringa R A survey of requirements engineering methods for pervasive services. In: Proceedings of the workshop on building software for pervasive computing, OOPSLA’05Google Scholar
  11. Lauesen S (2003) Task description as functional requirements. IEEE Softw 20:58–65Google Scholar
  12. Leonardi C, Sabatucci L, Susi A, Zancanaro M (2010a) Ahab’s leg: mediating semi-formal requirement to final users. In: Proceedings of the CAiSE’10, HammametGoogle Scholar
  13. Leonardi C, Sabatucci L, Susi A, Zancanaro M (2010b) Exploring the boundaries: when method fragmentation is not convenient. In: Proceedings of the IEEE FIPA workshop on design process documentation and fragmentation, LyonGoogle Scholar
  14. Neal DT, Wood W (2007) Automaticity in situ: the nature of habit in daily life. In: Psychology of action: mechanisms of human action, vol 2Google Scholar
  15. Nuseibeh B, Easterbrook S (2000) Requirements engineering: a roadmap. In: Proceedings of the conference on the future of software engineering. ACM, New York, pp 35–46Google Scholar
  16. Paternó F (2002) ConcurTaskTrees: an engineered approach to model-based design of interactive systems. Lawrence Erlbaum AssociatesGoogle Scholar
  17. Rolland C, Salinesi C (2009) Supporting Requirements Elicitation through goal/scenario coupling. In: Conceptual modeling: foundations and applications. Springer, Berlin, p 416Google Scholar
  18. Serral E, Valderas P, Pelechano V (2010a) Improving the cold-start problem in user task automation by using models at runtime. In: Proceedings of the ISD’10. Springer, pp 648–659Google Scholar
  19. Serral E, Valderas P, Pelechano V (2010b) Towards the model driven development of context-aware pervasive systems. PMC 6(2):254–280Google Scholar
  20. Sharp H, Rogers Y, Preece J (2007) Interaction design: beyond human computer interaction. Wiley, Chichester/HobokenGoogle Scholar
  21. Shepherd A (2001) Hierarchical task analysis. Taylor & Francis, LondonGoogle Scholar
  22. Sutcliffe A, Maiden N, Minocha S, Manuel D (1998) Supporting scenario-based requirements engineering. IEEE Trans Softw Eng 24:1072–1088Google Scholar
  23. Uchitel S, Chatley R, Kramer J, Magee J (2004) System architecture: the context for scenario-based model synthesis. In: Proceedings of the 12th symposium on FSE. ACM, New York, pp 33–42Google Scholar
  24. Van Lamsweerde A (2003) From system goals to software architecture. In: Bernardo M, Inverardi P (eds) Formal methods for software architectures. Springer, Berlin/New York, pp 25–43Google Scholar
  25. Weiser M (1995) The computer for the 21st century. Sci Am 78–89Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Estefanía Serral
    • 1
    Email author
  • Luca Sabatucci
    • 2
  • Chiara Leonardi
    • 2
  • Pedro Valderas
    • 1
  • Angelo Susi
    • 2
  • Massimo Zancanaro
    • 2
  • Vicente Pelechano
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de investigación en Métodos de Producción de SoftwareUniversidad Politécnica de ValenciaValenciaSpain
  2. 2.Fondazione Bruno Kessler IRSTTrentoItaly

Personalised recommendations