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Measuring Cone Density in a Japanese Macaque (Macaca fuscata) Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Commercially Available Adaptive Optics

  • Mark E. Pennesi
  • Anupam K. Garg
  • Shu Feng
  • Keith V. Michaels
  • Travis B. Smith
  • Jonathan D. Fay
  • Alison R. Weiss
  • Laurie M. Renner
  • Sawan Hurst
  • Trevor J. McGill
  • Anda Cornea
  • Kay D. Rittenhouse
  • Marvin Sperling
  • Joachim Fruebis
  • Martha Neuringer
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (volume 801)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using a commercially available high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) camera to image the cone mosaic in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) with dominantly inherited drusen. The macaques examined develop drusen closely resembling those seen in humans with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). For each animal, we acquired and processed images from the AO camera, montaged the results into a composite image, applied custom cone-counting software to detect individual cone photoreceptors, and created a cone density map of the macular region. We conclude that flood-illuminated AO provides a promising method of visualizing the cone mosaic in nonhuman primates. Future studies will quantify the longitudinal change in the cone mosaic and its relationship to the severity of drusen in these animals.

Keywords Cone density imaging Adaptive optics Flood-illuminated adaptive optics AMD 

Notes

Funding

Pfizer Ophthalmology External Research Unit, The Foundation Fighting Blindness CDA (MEP), Research to Prevent Blindness (Unrestricted grant to Casey Eye Institute, CDA to MEP), NIH grant P51OD011092 (MN), K08 EY021186-01 (MEP).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark E. Pennesi
    • 1
  • Anupam K. Garg
    • 1
  • Shu Feng
    • 1
  • Keith V. Michaels
    • 1
  • Travis B. Smith
    • 1
  • Jonathan D. Fay
    • 1
  • Alison R. Weiss
    • 2
  • Laurie M. Renner
    • 2
  • Sawan Hurst
    • 2
  • Trevor J. McGill
    • 1
  • Anda Cornea
    • 2
  • Kay D. Rittenhouse
    • 3
  • Marvin Sperling
    • 3
  • Joachim Fruebis
    • 3
  • Martha Neuringer
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye InstituteOregon Health & Science UniversityPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research CenterOregon Health & Science UniversityBeavertonUSA
  3. 3.External R&D Innovations,Pfizer Inc.CambridgeUSA

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