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Application of Next-Generation Sequencing to Identify Genes and Mutations Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

  • Stephen P. DaigerEmail author
  • Sara J. Bowne
  • Lori S. Sullivan
  • Susan H. Blanton
  • George M. Weinstock
  • Daniel C. Koboldt
  • Robert S. Fulton
  • David Larsen
  • Peter Humphries
  • Marian M. Humphries
  • Eric A. Pierce
  • Rui Chen
  • Yumei Li
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 801)

Abstract

The goal of our research is to identify genes and mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). For this purpose we established a cohort of more than 250 independently ascertained families with adRP in the Houston Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases. Affected members of each family were screened for disease-causing mutations in genes and gene regions that are commonly associated with adRP. By this approach, we detected mutations in 65 % of the families, leaving 85 families that are likely to harbor mutations outside of the “common” regions or in novel genes. Of these, 32 families were tested by several types of next-generation sequencing (NGS), including (a) targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) NGS, (b) whole exome NGS, and (c) targeted retinal-capture NGS. We detected mutations in 11 of these families (31 %) bringing the total detected in the adRP cohort to 70 %. Several large families have also been tested for linkage using Afymetrix single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays.

Keywords

Retinitis pigmentosa Next-generation sequencing Linkage mapping Mutation prevalence Retinal gene capture Whole-exome sequencing 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by NIH grant EY007142 and the Foundation Fighting Blindness. We thank Dr. David Birch, Dr John Heckenlively, Dr. Richard Lewis, Dr. Dianna Wheaton, Ms. Kari Branham, and Ms. Elizabeth Cadena for clinical assistance; and Ms. Cheryl Avery, Ms. Aimee Buhr, and Ms. Elizabeth Quimby for technical assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen P. Daiger
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sara J. Bowne
    • 1
  • Lori S. Sullivan
    • 1
  • Susan H. Blanton
    • 2
  • George M. Weinstock
    • 3
  • Daniel C. Koboldt
    • 3
  • Robert S. Fulton
    • 3
  • David Larsen
    • 3
  • Peter Humphries
    • 4
  • Marian M. Humphries
    • 4
  • Eric A. Pierce
    • 5
  • Rui Chen
    • 6
  • Yumei Li
    • 6
  1. 1.Human Genetics CenterSchool of Public Health, Univ. of Texas HSCHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Miami Institute for Human GenomicsUniv. of MiamiMiamiUSA
  3. 3.Genome InstituteWashington Univ. School of Med.St. LouisUSA
  4. 4.Dept. of GeneticsTrinity CollegeDublinIreland
  5. 5.Ocular Genomics InstituteMassachusetts Eye and Ear InfirmaryBostonUSA
  6. 6.Dept. of Molecular and Human GeneticsBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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