Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Instructional Approaches, Group Processes and Educational Designs

Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Its scope includes learning that takes place face to face (F2F), remotely and in blends of F2F and remote activity. It considers learning in groups of various sizes (from dyads to learning communities). It considers a range of approaches intended to promote and support collaborative learning, including instructor-led methods, scripted methods and methods that open up space for the autonomous, creative, productive work of the collaborating learners.

The chapter builds upon and updates related chapters in previous versions of the handbook. It provides the reader with links to broad-based, landmark reviews and summaries of this area and some of the core texts on the role of technology in CSCL. The chapter reviews selected research contributions from the last 5 years, identifying some emerging themes and highlighting important unresolved issues. It provides a conceptual orientation to the nature and potential educational benefits of CSCL. It summarises research results concerning real-time (synchronous) CSCL, blended designs for CSCL and CSCL using Web 2.0 technologies. It identifies some key issues in the methodology of CSCL research and also provides an overview of recent research on CSCL design using scripts and design patterns.

Keywords

Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) Networked learning Collaboration script Design pattern Participation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Peter Goodyear and Kate Thompson wish to acknowledge the support of the Australian Research Council through grant FL100100203.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Research on Computer Supported Learning and Cognition (CoCo)University of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.The Institute of Educational Technology, The Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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