The Role of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in Infant and Young Child Feeding Guideline Development and Program Implementation

  • Michelle R. Adler
  • Margaret Brewinski
  • Amie N. Heap
  • Omotayo Bolu
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 743)

Abstract

The basic science and clinical research investigating the relationship between HIV and breastfeeding has provided much of the evidence base for the development of public health policies and practice guidelines aimed at preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. Programmatically, however, translating the evidence into practice has been challenging. In 2003, President George W. Bush established the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to “turn the tide against AIDS in the most afflicted nations of Africa and the Caribbean.” Through multiple US agencies, PEPFAR will have provided $63 billion between 2004 and 2013 in direct financial support and technical assistance for the implementation of HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs throughout the world. Focusing on PEPFAR’s role in infant feeding guideline modification and implementation, this chapter reviews the history of infant feeding guideline revisions based on evolving research and evaluation, highlights the successes and challenges of translating this rapidly changing evidence into practice, and concludes with a discussion of potential strategies for the adoption and implementation of 2010 WHO PMTCT and infant feeding guidelines.

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle R. Adler
    • 1
  • Margaret Brewinski
    • 2
  • Amie N. Heap
    • 2
  • Omotayo Bolu
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Global HIV/AIDS, Maternal and Child Health Branch, Prevention of Mother to Child HIV Transmission (PMTCT)Centers for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.United States Agency for International DevelopmentOffice of HIV/AIDSWashingtonUSA

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