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ICT Solutions to Support EV Deployment

  • Anders Bro Pedersen
  • Bach Andersen
  • Joachim Skov Johansen
  • David Rua
  • José Ruela
  • João A. Peças Lopes
Chapter
Part of the Power Electronics and Power Systems book series (PEPS)

Abstract

Numerous studies and projects have proven that the electric vehicle can offer value and services that go beyond its function as a means of transportation. The value and services can, for instance, be the reduction of charging costs, adherence to grid constraints, or adjustment of charging behavior to renewable energy production. If these possibilities are considered and supported by information and communication technologies (ICT) in due time, a large potential can be exploited.

Specifically, the protocols and technologies spanning the open system interconnection stack need to support the various utilization concepts for EVs and be harmonized to obtain interoperability among numerous electric vehicle (EV) and electric vehicle supply equipment from original equipment manufacturers.

This chapter describes contemporary Smart Grid communication methods in terms of requirements and specific solutions and relates them to relevant standardization work and projects within the area.

Keywords

Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplex Electric Vehicle Smart Grid Wireless Mesh Network Transport Layer Security 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ACSI

Abstract communication service interface

AMI

Advanced metering infrastructure

AMM

Automated meter management

AMR

Automatic meter reading

AP

Access point

BPSK

Binary phase shift keying

CA

Certificate authentication

CAMC

Central autonomous management controller

CP

Control pilot

CSMA/CA

Carrier sense multiple access/collision avoidance

DER

Distributed energy resource

DMS

Distribution management system

DR

Demand response

DSO

Distribution system operator

DSSS

Direct sequence spread spectrum

EAN

Extended area network

EB

Energy box

EMS

Energy management system

EPRI

Electric Power Research Institute

ES

Electric storage

EV

Electric vehicle

EVSE

Electric vehicle supply equipment

FAN

Field area network

FC

Functional constraint

FDD

Frequency division duplex

FEC

Forward error correction

Gbps

Gigabit per second

GW

Gateway

HAN

Home area network

IAP

Interoperability architectural perspective

IP

Internet protocol

IT

Information technology

kbps

Kilobit per second

LW

Low voltage

MAC

Media access control

MAP

Mesh access point

Mbps

Megabits per second

MG

Microgrid

MGAU

Microgrid aggregator unit

MGCC

Microgrid central controller

MMG

Multi-microgrid

MMS

Manufacturing message specification

MV

Medium voltage

NAN

Neighborhood area network

NB-PLC

Narrowband power line communication

ND

Neighbor discovery

NIST

National Institute for Standards and Technology

OEM

Original equipment manufacturer

OFDM

Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing

OFDMA

Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access

OSI

Open systems interconnection

PAM

Pulse amplitude modulation

PKI

Public key infrastructure

PLC

Power line communication

PWM

Pulse width modulation

QAM

Quadrature amplitude modulation

QoS

Quality of service

RAU

Regional aggregation unit

RBAC

Role based access control

REST

Representational state transfer

SCL

Structured configuration language

SCSM

Specific communication service mapping

SDO

Standard development organization

SDP

SECC Discovery Protocol

SG

Smart grid

SGIRM

Smart grid interoperability reference model

SM

Smart meter

SOC

State-of-charge

TCP

Transmission control protocol

TDD

Time division duplex

TLS

Transport layer security

ToW

Time-on-wire

UAN

Utility access network

UDP

User datagram protocol

V2G

Vehicle-to-grid

WAN

Wide area network

WMN

Wireless mesh network

XML

Extensible markup language

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anders Bro Pedersen
    • 1
  • Bach Andersen
    • 1
  • Joachim Skov Johansen
    • 1
  • David Rua
    • 2
  • José Ruela
    • 2
  • João A. Peças Lopes
    • 2
  1. 1.Technical University of DenmarkKongens LyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.INESC TEC (formerly INESC Porto)PortoPortugal

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