trans- and Positional Isomers of Common Fatty Acids

  • Joyce L. Beare-Rogers
Part of the Advances in Nutritional Research book series (ANUR)

Abstract

Unsaturated fatty acids isomerized during the process of hydrogenation, whether in a commercial plant or in the rumen of an animal, become a mixture of geometric (cis and trans) and positional isomers. The nutritional properties of hydrogenated fats have been the subject of other reviews: Aaes-Jørgensen (1965); Gottenbos and Thomasson (1965); Beare-Rogers (1970); Kummerow (1974, 1975, 1979); Alfin-Slater and Aftergood (1979); Emken (1979, 1981); Spence (1980); Applewhite (1981); Kinsella et al. (1981).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joyce L. Beare-Rogers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of National Health and WelfareBureau of Nutritional Sciences, Food Directorate, Health Protection BranchOttawaCanada

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