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Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Advanced Composite Materials at Low Temperatures

  • M. Takeno
  • S. Nishijima
  • T. Okada
  • K. Fujioka
  • Y. Tsuchida
  • Y. Kuraoka
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Materials book series (ACRE, volume 32)

Abstract

Thermal and mechanical properties of advanced composite materials have been studied in order to examine their applicability to cryogenic use. Carbon, silicon carbide and alumina fiber unidirectionally reinforced epoxies were prepared as advanced composite materials and were compared with glass fiber reinforced epoxy. Thermal conductivity and thermal contraction have been measured in both directions parallel and perpendicular to fibers down to liquid helium and liquid nitrogen temperatures, respectively. To investigate mechanical properties, a four-point flexural test was also performed at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures, and Young’s moduli and breaking stress were calculated. Considering the specific modulus and the ratio of breaking stress to thermal conductivity, the advanced composite materials are found to be suitable for cryogenic structural support members.

Keywords

Thermal Conductivity Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Fiber Direction Thermal Contraction Breaking Stress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Takeno
    • 1
  • S. Nishijima
    • 1
  • T. Okada
    • 2
  • K. Fujioka
    • 2
  • Y. Tsuchida
    • 2
  • Y. Kuraoka
    • 2
  1. 1.ISIR Osaka UniversityIbaraki, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Cryogenic Technology Development CenterHoxan CorporationTsukuba, IbaragiJapan

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