Word-Associations in Experimental Psychiatry: A Historical Perspective

  • Manfred Spitzer

Abstract

The concept of association is one of the oldest and most fruitful in psychology. It has been used to describe and as well to explain various aspects of the experience and behavior of human beings. It also has been used to describe as well as to explain various aspects of psychopathology, especially pathological verbal behavior, in the field of psychiatry.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag, New York 1992

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  • Manfred Spitzer

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