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Meander-Belt Reservoir Geology, Mid-Dip Tuscaloosa, Little Creek Field, Mississippi

  • Ernie G. Werren
  • Roger D. Shew
  • Emmet R. Adams
  • Richard J. Stancliffe
Part of the Casebooks in Earth Sciences book series (CASEBOOKS)

Abstract

Meander belts represent the first genetic sequences that were understood by geologists. Research on modern point bars in the Brazos River of South Texas in the period 1953 to 1960 led to the formulation of a facies model that was directly applicable to subsurface exploration (Bernard and Major, 1963). It is this model which, in the late 1950s and early 1960s, guided the exploration and development of Little Creek Field, the case study of this chapter. This chapter represents one of the first uses of facies models in the oil industry and is a documentation of the first point-bar reservoir to be explored and produced with geologic forethought. The success of the point-bar facies model in predicting reservoir distribution can be measured by the high success rate of drilling by the main operators as compared with that of the surrounding farmed-out acreage.

Key Words

Little Creek Field Mississippi Mississippi Salt basin Lower Tuscaloosa Formation Upper Cretaceous Cenomanian Fluvial meander belt enhanced oil recovery poit-bar sandstones chlorite low resistivity pays dipmeters compaction seismic stratigraphy 

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References

  1. Bernard, H. A., and Major, C. F., Jr., 1963, Recent meander belt deposits of the Brazos River: An alluvial “sand” model [abst.]: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 47, p. 350.Google Scholar
  2. Cronquist, C, 1968, Waterflooding by linear displacement in Little Creek Field, Mississippi: Journal of Petroleum Technology Transactions, v. 243, p. 525–533.Google Scholar
  3. Hansen, P. W., 1977, A CO2 Tertiary recovery pilot, Little Creek Field, Mississippi: Society of Petroleum Engineers, Paper 6747, 7 pp.Google Scholar
  4. Shew, R. D., 1987, Seismic and geologic interpretation and reservoir properties of the Lower Tuscaloosa B Sandstone, Olive Field, southwestern Mississippi: Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Annual Meeting, New Orleans, p. 131–132.Google Scholar
  5. Shew, R. D., Werren, E.G., Adams, E. R., and Stancliffe, R. J., 1989, Depositional, diagenetic, production, and seismic characteristics of a Mid-Dip Tuscaloosa point-bar complex, Little Creek Field, Mississippi [abst.]: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 73, p. 412.Google Scholar
  6. Stancliffe, R. J., and Adams, E. R., 1986, Lower Tuscaloosa fluvial channel styles at Liberty Field, Amite County, Mississippi: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 36, p. 305–313.Google Scholar
  7. Thomson, A., 1979, Preservation of porosity in the deep Woodbine/Tuscaloosa Trend, Louisiana: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 29, p. 396–403.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernie G. Werren
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Roger D. Shew
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Emmet R. Adams
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Richard J. Stancliffe
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.BP Exploration Inc.HoustonUSA
  2. 2.Shell Development CompanyHoustonUSA
  3. 3.ConsultantNew OrleansUSA
  4. 4.Shell Offshore Inc.New OrleansUSA

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