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Stress, Coping, and Illness

A Transactional Perspective
  • James C. Coyne
  • Kenneth Holroyd

Abstract

Impressive gains in the control of communicable disease and the treatment of acute illness have paradoxically confronted us with the limitations of the dominant medical model. As the leading cause of death in Western countries has shifted from infectious to chronic diseases, it has become apparent that solutions to the problems of health and illness will prove far more complex than had been anticipated by scientists only a few decades ago. It is no longer possible to view illness as “a thing in itself, essentially unrelated to the patient’s personality, his bodily constitution, or his mode of life” (Dubos, 1965, p. 319). Single-factor conceptions of illness derived from infectious disease are proving too linear, restrictive, and oversimplified to deal with the multifaceted nature of chronic illness (Weiner, 1977).

Keywords

Social Support Family Therapy Stressful Life Event Behavioral Medicine Coping Skill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Coyne
    • 1
  • Kenneth Holroyd
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyOhio UniversityAthensUSA

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