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Watching Children Watch Television

  • Daniel R. Anderson
  • Linda F. Alwitt
  • Elizabeth Pugzles Lorch
  • Stephen R. Levin

Abstract

The national pastime of American children is watching television. They spend perhaps 20% of their waking hours in front of TV sets, cumulatively more time than they spend in school (Lyle & Hoffman, 1972a, b). Although there has been some research interest in the social and cognitive impact of television (cf. Liebert, Neale, & Davidson, 1973; Stein & Friedrich, 1975), there have been few studies on the nature and development of TV viewing itself. There has been little information on how children watch, why they watch, or what they watch.

Keywords

Visual Attention Male Voice Auditory Attention Sesame Street Auditory Attribute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel R. Anderson
    • 1
  • Linda F. Alwitt
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Pugzles Lorch
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Levin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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