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An Approach to Automatic Robot Programming

  • Tomás Lozano-Pérez
  • Rodney A. Brooks

Abstract

In this paper we propose an architecture for a new task-level system, which we call ATLAS (Automatic Task Level Assembly Synthesizer). Task-level programming attempts to simplify the robot programming process by requiring that the user specify only goals for the physical relationships among objects, rather than the motions of the robot needed to achieve those goals. A task-level specification is meant to be completely robot independent; no positions or paths that depend on the robot geometry or kinematics are specified by the user. We have two goals for this paper. The first is to present a more unified treatment of some individual pieces of task planning research whose relationships have not previously been described. The second is to provide a new framework for further research in task planning. We stress, however, that ATLAS as a whole has not been implemented and therefore, the description here indicates primarily a direction for future research.

Keywords

Obstacle Avoidance Planning Module Task Planning Fine Motion Plan Step 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomás Lozano-Pérez
    • 1
  • Rodney A. Brooks
    • 1
  1. 1.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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