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Common Viral Respiratory Illnesses

  • Sandra Nusinoff Lehrman
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Abstract

The rhinoviruses are the most frequently isolated agents associated with the “common cold.” They are small RNA-containing viruses of the picornavirus group. Rhinoviruses are acid labile and grow optimally at temperatures of 33–34°C. They grow poorly at 37°C and do not survive the acid pH of the human gastrointestinal tract. Because the surface temperature of the nostrils is approximately 34°C, these viruses are ideally adapted as agents of upper respiratory tract disease.

Keywords

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection Common Cold Adenovirus Infection Rhinovirus Infection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Nusinoff Lehrman

There are no affiliations available

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