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The Self as Mediator of Cognitive Change in Psychotherapy

  • Vittorio F. Guidano
Part of the Advances in the Study of Communication and Affect book series (ASCA, volume 11)

Abstract

In their recent review of the latest developments in cognitive psychotherapy, Reda and Mahoney (1984) propose that current cognitive approaches be divided into two broad camps: (a) those that adopt a “surface-structure associationistic” model and (b) those that endorse a “deep-structure constructivistic” metatheory.

Keywords

Tacit Knowledge Personal Identity Cognitive Change Symbolic Process Evolutionary Epistemology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vittorio F. Guidano
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro Di Psicoterapia CognitivaRomaItaly

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