Abstract

Conduct disorder encompasses a broad range of antisocial behaviors, such as aggressive acts, theft, vandalism, firesetting, lying, truancy, and running away. Although these behaviors are diverse, their common characteristic is that they tend to violate major social rules and expectations. Many of the behaviors often reflect actions against the environment, including both persons and property. Many antisocial behaviors emerge in some form over the course of normal development. Fighting, lying, stealing, destruction of property and noncompliance are relatively high at different points in childhood (Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1981; MacFarlane, Allen & Honzik, 1954). For the most part, these behaviors diminish over time, do not interfere with everyday functioning, and do not predict untoward consequences in adulthood.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan E. Kazdin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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