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The nutritional value of selected Asiatic pulses: chickpea, black gram, mung bean and pigeon pea

  • S. K. Sathe

Abstract

Plants are an important source of nutrients in the human diet. Over 3000 plant species have been used as human food throughout history (Borlaug, 1981). Of these, at least 150 different species are grown in sufficient quantity and are thus important in world food trade. Cereals constitute the single most important group of food plants in the human diet (excluding the large number of species of fruits and vegetables). Legumes are next to cereals in terms of their economic and nutritional importance as human food resources. They are valued not only for their protein and carbohydrate contents (just as cereals) but also because of the oil content of oilseed legumes such as soybeans and peanuts. The ability of legumes to fix atmospheric nitrogen in the soil-crop ecosystem is one of their unique and beneficial characteristics among all plant species. The amount of nitrogen fixed in the soil equals the amount of nitrogen input from commercial fertilizers (Delwiche, 1978).

Keywords

Phytic Acid Mung Bean Cicer Arietinum Antinutritional Factor Food Legume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© E. Nwokolo and J. Smartt 1996

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  • S. K. Sathe

There are no affiliations available

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